How To Choose A Good Domain Name

Posted On:2017-12-31    Category: Online Marketing
How To Choose A Good Domain Name

What is a Domain Name?

Domain name is the address of your website that people type in the browser URL bar to visit your website.

In simple terms, if your website was a house, then your domain name will be its address.

If domain name is the address of your website, then web hosting is the home where your website lives.

This is the actual computer where your website’s files are stored. These servers are offered as a service by hosting companies.

Why do you need a Domain Name?

On the Internet, your domain name is your unique identity. Any individual, business or organization planning to have an Internet presence should FIRST BUY a domain name. Having your own domain name, website and email addresses will give you and your business a more professional look.

Another reason for an Individual OR business to register a domain name is to protect copyrights and trademarks, build creditability, increase brand awareness, and search engine positioning.

To create your BLOG website, you need both domain name and web hosting.

A domain name is more than an address. It is your blog, your website, your business and your online identity.

That's why your domain name must be you. Make it recognizable, easy to remember, and a proud representation of you and your brand.

Examples of domain names are www.facebook.com, www.safaricom.com, www.yourname.co.ke etc

Tips On Choosing a good Domain

1. Choose a Unique Brandable name

If you are marketing yourself, using a blog its advisable to use your first and last names (johnsmith.co.ke or janesmith.com) or your 2 most known names.

Even if you aren't marketing yourself, it's advisable to register your name as a domain now amd you can always use it later because you may want it the future only to find its already taken by someone else. If you are marketing your business, you may want to use your business name (yourbusiness.com) as a domain.

2. Make it easy to pronounce and spell

You should be able to easily share your domain when speaking as well as writing.

Dont make your domain a tongue twister. You never know when you’ll be asked to share your domain name in person.

It should be easy to understand and spell for any listener.

3. Make it easy to type

If you have to spell out your domain name more than once for it to be understood, then it won't work. Keep the domain name simple to remember and easy to enter in an address bar or search field.

Why is simplicity important? Because you don't want your future visitors to incorrectly type in your name and be directed to a different site.

4. Keep it short

Shorter is always better. If you can’t get your domain name down to one memorable word (almost impossible to come by these days), then consider adding one or maximum two more words. Combinations of two words work great for the memorable names like LifeHacker.com or GeekSquad.com. Also, don’t use an acronym. People will never remember the letters unless it’s a highly catchy name.

While keywords are important, don’t go overboard with domain length. It’s better to have a domain name that’s short and memorable.

It’s a good idea to keep your domain name between 6-15 characters. Longer domains are harder for your users to remember.

Not to mention, users will also be more prone to entering typos with longer domain names, and you’ll lose out on that traffic.

That’s why it’s a good idea to keep your domain length short.

5. Avoid Hyphens and Numbers

Remember how your domain name should be easy to spell and pronounce? Well, hyphens and numbers make both of these things more difficult.

Imagine explaining Facebook if it had a hyphen in there…

“Have you seen this new site Face-Book? There’s a hyphen in there by the way, between the ‘Face’ and the ‘Book.’”

Facebook may not have spread so quickly if that was the case.

The bottom line? Your domain name should be smooth and punchy, and hyphens and numbers get in the way of that.

So, stick to letters!

 

 

 

 





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